The Red Queen

Employee for a month

September 10, 2010
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It’s official–I’ve been employed for a month now. :)

Having to turn down three job offers and having to accept the one I currently have instead isn’t easy–as I am constantly bombarded with statements that start with what ifs.

I can, however, say that I am satisfied with my job now. My job title might not (yet) be my dream job title, yet I think that it could somehow help me pave the path.

I am Asia PokerNews’ blogger/linkbuilder–so basically, I am (now) a writer. :P I’ve always thought highly of online marketing, as I think that people in that field have great things to look forward to. Well, I think that the online industry would get bigger and better in time; so, yeah, I think that investing in the said field would be a fairly wise move. (hey, how many times have I used “think” here? haha)

My job’s pretty rewarding: (1) our big boss is an expat who knows how to keep his people motivated and confident; (2) my supervisor is like a manager and a mother rolled into one; (3) my team mates know work-life balance; (4) people, or at least those who know poker, think of my job as a cool one;  (5) I get to stay at five star deluxe hotels, visit casinos, and party for free; and (6) I get to fly to Macau (and hopefully to Taiwan and Cebu as well) for free too! How cool is that?! Haha :P

Problem is, I am not much into poker. Actually, I just learned how to play the game through the poker training we had days after I entered the company. Meaning, I should really be exerting a lot of effort in learning poker terms and knowing poker legends if I would want to do my job better.

I am a passenger riding the train of learning–hoping to get to my destination with a smile still drawn on my face and with excitement still making my eyes sparkle. :)


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On HR and Disenchantment

August 4, 2010
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For the past month, I’ve been through 6 (and missed 4) job interviews/tests–and I have 4 more pending for the next five days. Yeah, I’m trying to major in Job Interview and Testing here. :P

Naturally, I felt really excited upon being called-in by companies. I got lost in Ayala Ave more than twice; came in late for my interview more than thrice; and felt uneasy answering the question “Can you tell me about yourself?” almost every time I face an interviewer (see, I’m really allergic to that question). Yet I still find the idea of having to locate the offices, dressing nicely to appear presentable, and warmly greeting every person I get to talk to exciting.

My recent experience, though, sort of served as a disenchantment.

I’ve always believed that organizations/companies should regard their people as their greatest assets. This high regard for people, IMO, should be expressed (first and foremost) with how they package their Human Resource (HR) Department: the HR people, the things they hang on their walls, their office, their exams and interviews, etc. It is, after all, the HRD that would give the potential employees a glimpse of how things are in their company.

I admire Logica‘s Recruitment Center for being appealing to applicants (at least to me) with all those posters they have on employee empowerment, value for people, and career advancement–and with their posting of their vision and mission which has also to do with them being good employers. Sadly, the position they are offering me isn’t something that could lead me to my dream job. So, yeah, I declined their offer.

A company in Pasig made me feel disappointed and somewhat disenchanted about how potential employees are dealt with.

Their office looked like a factory–I never complained about that since I knew anyways of the company’s background. I just didn’t expect that they would:

- make the applicants wait for an hour in a room with just one electric fan working (no a/c) before calling them in for initial interview;

- make them wait for another hour for an interview with the HR head;

- make them wait for another 2 hours before they are made to answer IQ and personality tests wherein most questions have already been discussed during the interview;

- make them answer 2 sheets of essay-type tests which almost had the same questions anyways;

- and make them answer the question: “What can the company expects from you as a Marketing Officer. Please explain.”

Irritatedly, I slashed the “s” off “expects” and placed question marks where they should have been present–I am theorizing that their keyboard’s “?” key malfunctioned since all of the questions didn’t have question marks in them. Yeah, what I did might be a bit impolite. But hey, shouldn’t they at least be proofreading their materials before having them photocopied for all their possible employees to see?

One of my co-applicants jokingly said that he though of the test as more of a “Patience test” than an “IQ test,” haha. :P

They called me in for an interview with the Department Head two days ago. But the experience was too disenchanting. :)

I have a job offer now, but it hasn’t officially reached me yet (I just learned of it through the phone)–so I am still not stopping with my job hunting adventures yet, haha :P


Two-timer.

July 9, 2010
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Contentment is but a word that people use to make themselves feel good about what they already have — and to assure themselves that they don’t really need to get their hands on the things that they could (at the moment) not have.

Job hunting isn’t as easy as I thought it would be. Well, knowing that I would be graduating from the University of the Philippines Manila with the degree (BA Organizational Communication) that opens my career path to a number of destinations made me think that way. Now, however, it has come to my realization that neither being a UP graduate nor would being a jack-of-all-trades guarantee me seats in, say, corporations. Some say that in finding a desirable job, an ample amount of luck is needed.

After graduation, I almost felt contented with what has happened in my life — with having to part ways with school and the stressful life that comes with it, especially. I was made to go the States to rest for 70 days without having to worry about things other than where to spend the weekend and what to grab from the stores — now, who would not love that kind of life? Then, I got tired after like 25 days of doing the same stuff every single day — it made me feel like my brain was being eaten by zombies. So I decided to look for a part time internet-based job.

I had my first (part time) job with writers.ph. I was really excited about having to write again — especially that I am allowed to choose which topics to write about. It was frustrating, though, when I realized that majority of the “clients” writers.ph had were just a bunch of lazy students who irresponsibly chose to spend their allowance paying other people to do their school works for them than learn by doing them themselves. I stopped writing for them since doing so was against my principles and values. I am, however, still taking Editing and Proofreading jobs on writers.ph.

Since getting my dream job would probably take a while, I am now considering taking another part time job. A part time job that I could still maintain even when I already have a full time job — an English tutoring job with RareJob. I really can’t stand being idle for a long time. I wonder if having a part time and a full time job make me seem like a two-timer. Haha :P


Red eh?

November 6, 2009
1 Comment

I’m making an entry now simply because I miss making one for this blog already :P Checking this blog has been one of my automatically generated activities–err, hope you were able to digest that.

Funny thing’s that people are checking out my blog in search of solutions for the problems they encounter in Cafe World. XD One of those stuff people frequently search via search engines is that their employees do no work in Cafe World – and, yeah, they’re able to reach my blog with searches like that. They are then led to that entry I have entitled Cafe World VS Restaurant City…. Hmm, maybe I should compile all those Cafe World-related stuff people search in search engines — well, just those that lead them to my blog :P

And, oh. This blog earned me a .25 upgrade in my OrCom152 class. Thanks, Sir Barry. And, yeah, maybe I would consider maintaining this blog at that :P


Virus spread!

October 26, 2009
6 Comments

It was more than a month ago when we were tasked to make a video, post it on YouTube, and make it viral.

Then a week (or was that weeks) after that, Sir Barry invited Mr. Paolo Pangan (Yehey’s Digital Strategy Manager) over to give a lecture on viral marketing. Me talking to my self: sayang, had we learned how to do viral marketing early on, our videos would have been much successful.

Initially, I thought of Yehey! as a Pinoy version of Yahoo!–I actually remember creating an account there when it was first made available to public. But, well, no, Yehey! offers services a lot more varied than those that Yahoo! offers. Do visit their site to know more of what I am saying here :P

Speaking of viral videos, I just checked out our viral video in YouTube earlier — and what I saw really made me happy:

hits: 3311; and check out the comments :P

hits: 3311; and check out the comments :P

some more comments :D

some more comments :D

and then some more

and then some more

Sorry for the photo-dump-like-feel :P Got excited much? Haha. I just think it’s plain amusing, since I guess Christian’s the only one in our group who’s still monitoring this video up to now. If it is that we were able to lay the right foundation for a video to be viral, or Christian’s been secretly promoting our videos up to now — still, something here tells me that we’re being effective :D


KFC. Tokyo Tokyo. Mister Donut.

October 26, 2009
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We had our final horrah (Barrientos, 2009) earlier at RAMCAR Food Group in Tomas Morato. We were made to do a comm plan for the company — you may check out the guidelines here.

RAMCAR Group of Comanies is a family-owned and managed conglomerate. Its most famous brands are Motolite, KFC, Tokyo Tokyo, and Mister Donut. Motolite is under the RAMCAR Battery Group — which, according to KFC employees, have really good incentive packages for its employees.

KFC and Mister Donut are doing great as well. However with the acquisition of Tokyo Tokyo in 2009, RAMCAR feels that a RAMCAR Food Group (RFG) must be formed as well — yes, just like their counterpart for Batteries.

It is then, the consultants’ (or our) task to provide the needs of its clients (RAMCAR Food Group) — our topic: employer branding.

Our group, Pink Splat, had three objectives for our comm plan: (1)for RFG’s corporate visual identity; (2) for internals; and (3) for externals.

Below’s one of Pink Splat’s posters for the RFG comm plan (made by collaterals department head, Tami Ruiz) — my favorite poster, actually:

one of Pink Splat's posters for RFG Comm Plan

I wouldn’t be posting our comm plan here anymore — too much for the toxicity part already :P

We did what we can do — had sleepless nights and draining brainstormings — and we’re happy with the outcome. :)


Insert reply here

October 25, 2009
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Checked my mail’s spam folder earlier for an e-mail (with attachment) from a group mate — but no, I did not find what I was looking for there. Instead, I found something unexpected: an e-mail from Arnold Garbriel Jonathan Conti — Conti’s Trinoma’s reply to the e-mail I sent them weeks ago.

Conti’s sent me a reply last Sunday, October 18, 2009. Below’s a screen shot of what Conti’s Pastry Shop and Restaurant sent me.

from contis_trinoma@yahoo.com

from contis_trinoma@yahoo.com

Urgh, I’m now feeling guilty — I didn’t state that I wanted disciplinary action be done to the Conti’s Trinoma staff I encountered. :|

Yet, I think of Conti’s replying to the e-mail I sent them as something good — both for the company’s reputation and for the customer’s satisfaction.

Thank you, Conti’s Trinoma, for not snobbing that e-mail I sent you :P


Complaining, et.al

October 16, 2009
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In our PR class with Sir Barry last sem, he asked us to share our experiences on having bad encounters with establishments’ staff. My classmates shared a lot — and Sir Barry shared his own experience as well. I can’t remember, though, whether his experience was with Shopwise or with PureGold.

He was shopping for Christmas baskets with his family that time. He asked for a staff’s help — but the staff happens to be impolite and unprofessional in dealing with him. I can’t really remember everything, but that’s basically how the story goes.

Anyways, Sir Barry dealt with his, erm, problem, lightly. He didn’t put himself in a shameful situation by arguing with the staff, pointing out their mistakes, and, well, being eskandaloso. Instead, he sent an executive (err, my memory’s capacity really sucks, sorry) an e-mail containing his sentiments — very professional, very Sir Barry. ;p

Sir Barry’s efforts weren’t put to waste. He got a reply from the executive, telling him that they already sent their staff to a training in response to his complaints — and, the executive showed how much they’ve appreciated what Sir Barry did by sending him a Christmas basket for free :P

No, you’re not reading a story book nor a sir-barry’s-so-great kind of post. I just wanted to share that from Sir Barry’s kwento, I learned how to deal with things better — that being lion-like in dealing with rude staff isn’t always the best option. Good PR skills’ a key here.

I had a disappointing experience with Conti’s Trinoma ealier. Yet I remained calm and composed — keeping in mind that I’ve learned a lot from my 4 years of stay in my degree already, and that I know PR.

I decided to, instead, send Conti’s an SMS after the encounter — asking for their company’s e-mail address since I had something to share with the management. The staff replied to my SMS with their e-mail addresses.

Conti's Logo

Conti's Logo

Here’s what I sent Conti’s:

Dear Ma’am/Sir,

I am Jhe David, a senior BA Organizational Communication student at the University of the Philippines Manila.

I am sending you this e-mail to let you know of the experience I had with Conti’s Trinoma earlier this evening.

My family and I regularly visit Conti’s Trinoma to grab goods for take-out since we reside nearby. We usually experience great service and get quality products from your store. What I experienced earlier, however, was quite disappointing.

It was around 8:45pm when I came in the store and ordered linguine in pesto sauce with seafoods (serving size’s good for 8 people). The cashier-on-duty called up the kitchen to check if how long I’d have to wait for my order to be served — she then told me that I’d have to wait for 30-45mins for my pasta. I asked her if I could just pay for what I ordered, and come back in 40mins to pick-up my order — she agreed.

45mins passed, I came back to the store, presented my receipt, and tried claiming my order. They asked me to sit down and wait till my order is served. Then a staff approached me, politely telling me that they already ran out of pesto sauce — meaning, they can’t serve my order.

I asked for reimbursement instead, and didn’t argue with the staff anymore since I knew that doing so wouldn’t really solve the problem — and I wouldn’t want to waste any of my and their time anymore.

I ordered for 2 slices of Mango Bravo instead. Still, to go — I wanted to bring something home for my brother. I sat down and waited for my order to be served. However, I cannot understand why it took them 15mins before having my order served — it was, after all, just two slices of cake. I was watching them, nobody was fixing my order. Had I not stood there in front of the cashier and politely asked that my order be fixed, nobody would have attended to my order.

Conti’s Trinoma is one of my personal favorites, I’m just sad and disappointed that I’ve experienced service that, for lack of a better term, sucked.

I really hope Conti’s Trinoma would address this concern immediately. I wouldn’t want to visit the store, going home with the same bad experience again. Perhaps the management could make better operations plan — or at least make sure their employees coordinate well.

Thank you, and good day!

Sincerely,

Jhe David

Dear Ma’am/Sir,
I am Jhe David, a senior BA Organizational Communication student at the University of the Philippines Manila.
I am sending you this e-mail to let you know of the experience I had with Conti’s Trinoma earlier this evening.
My family and I regularly visit Conti’s Trinoma to grab goods for take-out since we leave nearby. We usually experience great service and get quality products from your store. What I experienced earlier, however, was quite disappointing.
It was around 8:45pm when I came in the store and ordered linguine in pesto sauce (serving size’s good for 8 people). The cashier-on-duty called up the kitchen to check if how long I’d have to wait for my order to be served — she then told me that I’d have to wait for 30-45mins for my pasta. I asked her if I could just pay for what I ordered, and come back in 40mins to pick-up my order. She agreed.
45mins passed, I came back to the store, presented my receipt, and tried claiming my order. They asked me to sit down and wait till my order is served. Then a staff approached me, politely telling me that they already ran out of pesto sauce — meaning, they can’t serve my order.
I asked for reimbursement instead, and didn’t argue with the staff anymore since I knew that doing so wouldn’t really solve the problem — and I wouldn’t wanna waste any of my time anymore.
I ordered for 2 slices of Mango Bravo instead. Still, to go — I wanted to bring something home for my parents. I sat down and waited for my order to be served. However, I cannot understand why it took them 15mins before having my order served — it was, after all, just two slices of cake. I was watching them, nobody was fixing my order. Had I not stood there in front of the cashier and asked that my order be fixed, nobody would have attended to my order.
Conti’s Trinoma is one of my personal favorites, I’m just sad and disappointed that I’ve experienced service that, should I say, sucked.
I really hope Conti’s Trinoma would address this concern immediately. I wouldn’t want to visit the store, going home with the same bad experience again. Perhaps the management could make better operations plan — or at least make sure their employees coordinate well.
Thank you, and good day!
Sincerely,
Jhe David

I just hope that Conti’s would give me a respond somewhat similar with how Shopwise/PureGold responded to Sir Barry’s e-mail. Hehe.

PS: Next time you hit Trinoma, try grabbing Conti’s Linguine in Pesto Sauce with Seafoods — I wouldn’t go as far as sending them an e-mail if their foods weren’t essential to my existence :P And, oh, Mango Bravo is love :D

Mango Bravo

Mango Bravo


6 posts short.

October 12, 2009
6 Comments

So, they said that by now, we should have a total of 20 entries in our comm blogs already. WordPress says I only got 14 posts.

Now, where would I get those 6 missing blog posts?! -.-

OrCom students only have 15-21 units per sem — but, heck, we’re as busy as bees! (really now??)

We make presentations, papers, research works, and (come fourth year) thesis.

Yes, thesis. That’s what almost every Senior OrCom student talks about via status updates in Facebook.

And, yes, you’ve read it right — us OrCom students are still very much active in SNS (Social Networking Sites) even with the busy schedule and academic demands we have :P

Socialization is truly a part of the OrCom practice — read: Silver Screen (OrCom Alumni Homecoming) was a hit! The organizers done well :)

On Silver Screen

On Silver Screen

Hmm.. No wonder we are still able to blog about things during hell weeks.

Stress? What stress? ;P

6 5 posts short :D


A 3 in my classcard.

October 9, 2009
6 Comments

I browsed through my Friendster pics (yes, I still use friendster — at times) just now. Then memories of my almost stress-free high school life started making me smile.

4th Year High School Class Picture :)

4th Year High School Class Picture :)

Now I’m missing those days when we did not have much to worry about. We just had to study come quarterly examinations, pass our annual book reports, do our research-based homeworks (yes, those things we print out on bond papers then cut-out and paste in our notebooks), and have tons of fun with our peers.

Of course we had those stressful days too — I was just lucky that I went through those stressful times with the most optimistic, jolly, and caring people I know of. (naks! :D )

A semi-barkada shot. Me-ann, Milli, and Remy were not in the picture with us.

A semi-barkada under-the-table shot. Me-ann, Milli, and Remy are not in the picture with us. :(

Those pictures I’ve posted above were taken on our 4th year in St. Paul. Now that I am, again, a 4th year student (in UP Manila this time, though), I can say that I’ve evolved much already — Organizational Communication contributed much to my evolution.

I can still remember Sir Barry asking us on how the OrCom program has changed us through the years that we were subjected to it. It was during the start of this sem that we were made to reflect on that question. I was among those people he called in class to answer the question he raised — being my usual self, though, I gave him an answer that was just meant to entertain the class.

I chose not to answer the question seriously at that time — not because I simply wanted to give my classmates a good laugh, but because I did not have anything in mind then.

Now that the sem’s almost ending, I can confidently say that OrCom had a huge role in defining the Jhe people know of now.

Before: Nothing and no one could make me speak alone in front of the class for more than 5 mins without having to say “kinakabahan ako.”

Now: I can make presentations and speeches that would last for more than 5 mins — yet I still feel that kaba, which I think is due to the fact that I know that the outcome of my actions would not only, if ever, damage my grade but my group mates’ grades as well.

Because it is in OrCom that our people skills are honed and applied.

Before: I used to do my homework as soon as I reach home; play Ragnarok and chat with friends till the sun rises; sleep; and go to school both to socialize and to study.

Now: I sleep as I reach home; do my school works till sunrise; and go to school  both to socialize and to study.

Because it is in OrCom that we are made to learn the meaning of the words responsibility and consequences.

Before: I used to listen to my teachers’ lectures and write down their words (in verbatim) in my notebooks — one or two for each subject; study my notes and our books once in every quarter for the examinations; and wait for my name in that list of top 25 students written on our blackboards come distribution of cards day.

Now: I listen to both my professor’s lectures and my classmates’ opinions; write down my thoughts and learnings in my notebook — just one for all of my subjects for the semester; study my notes and those photocopied materials we get from Alva whenever the need arises; and pray for at least a 3 in my class cards come end of sem.

Because it is in OrCom that we are taught to be opinionated, resourceful, industrious, and hopeful. :P

If I am to make an entry on every bit of change OrCom has done to me, perhaps a day of thinking, reading, and writing would not be enough.

And yes, it is in OrCom that I learned how to really exaggerate things. Don’t ask why. :P


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